Spring blooms

This time last year, I was in Japan for a friend’s wedding, enjoying walks through parks lined with pink and white cherry blossom trees. Spring has finally arrived in Switzerland, and what an amazing change from the dreary foggy greys to lovely pastel floral blooms and bright greens of new young leaves appearing on bald branches. 

   
    
    
    
 

Wild Inspirations

I visited the Zurich Zoo last weekend and had a wonderful time with my mum and my youngest son. There were several food stands littered throughout the zoo, interesting and challenging playgrounds and the open enclosures allow visitors to get up close and personal to the myriad animals.

I couldn’t help but marvel at how fortunate animals are in Switzerland. Compared to the smelly, world-weary camels we saw in Morocco – with their constant groupie of gnats buzzing around them, their humps, or should I say, ‘stumps’ flattened to non-existence for tourists to sit on, the camels here boasted of thick, luscious golden brown fur, have access to a wide open field to roam around that is filled with food aplenty.

We were really excited standing in front of the glass divider of the tiger enclosure. A majestic looking tiger swaggered up to his lunch with strong, sure strides. We couldn’t see what his lunch comprised of, until he sank his teeth in, and starting parading his meal – a big, furry rabbit infront of everyone. There were loud gasps amongst the children, watching avidly at the exciting and at the same time morbid scene of the tiger mauling and gnawing his meal and seeing fluffy fur flying everywhere!

Well, this poor bunny sure didn’t survive past Easter!

I got inspired to do a new painting, this one of a few cows grazing on the  alps by the Furka Pass. I remembered more than 10 years ago, I painted a few t shirts to sell to friends, many of which were animal inspired. 

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What animal-inspired crafts have you made recently?

The Art of PlaY

We dedicated last weekend to making big messy art and learning all about the concept and engineering of PLAY at the Kunsthalle.

We joined Lemady at her weekend Storycraft session which was inspired by all forms of construction vehicles in ‘Dig, Dig, Digging’, written by Margaret Moyo. The kids plunged toy tractors, steam-rollers, cranes and trucks into trays of paint and ran these vehicles with multicolored wheels over a large paper canvas. It wasn’t long before hands, tiny feet and bums in nappies joined in the fun to create a beautiful abstract piece of art.

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IMG_4218The Kunsthalle in Zurich is currently showcasing an educational and interactive exhibition called The PlaYground Project (20 Feb – 15 May 2016). Art workshops for families, guided tours and even pop-up yoga sessions are available too.

We learnt how the concept of a public play space evolved from the post WW2 years to the present, and how the changes in the design of playgrounds reflect society’s changing ideas of adventure, education and childhood, creativity and control.

It is interesting to learn how the ‘new’ playgrounds after WW2 started as an initiative to help traumatised kids, with play used as a form of rehabilitative therapy. The Scandinavian urban landscapers and architects were the pioneers of independent creative play in the 1930s. They introduced the use of natural material, water and sand around abstract play sculptures.

After them came the concept of adventure playgrounds, where parents and children become more and more involved in the creation of play spaces as community projects. The premise of an adventure playground is … ‘it is never complete, never developed. It is a sort of ‘terrain vague’ that can be many things to many children’ (Jack Lambert, pioneer of adventure playgrounds).

I can imagine it to be like being on an episode of the reality show ‘Survival’, where children get to mess around with junk, build houses with timber and any material found on the ground and developing their own brand of play. Switzerland’s brand of adventure play comes in the form of ‘Robinson Crusoe-playgrounds’; and of course, kids here can sign up for playgroups in the forest or at a farm and learn to play independently in different natural settings.

I remember growing up in Singapore with sandpit playgrounds, with traditional fixed equipment like a swing, slide and see saw. The playgrounds in the 1980s were pretty iconic with shapes of lions and dragons. In land scarce Singapore, these limited open spaces are play4.jpgstill very much the pulse of the heartlands/community. It is where children, families and retired senior citizens congregate and have a short reprieve from the hustle and bustle of city life. The last few times I’ve visited Singapore, I’ve noticed that although public housing are becoming taller (think living on the 50th storey!) and rural land have given way to new shopping malls, the government still managed to make this little island city green for its 5 million dwellers. New high rise housing and office buildings often have ‘floating gardens, swimming pools and play areas’, water play areas are built on top of shopping malls and in places of interest like the Zoo or at the Gardens by the Bay.

In this modern day, it seems like norms and boredom have crept into the play space. People are more paranoid about safety of play equipment, sturdiness of trees for climbing, water and sand not cleaned or replaced often enough etc. It is becoming more and more challenging for urban planners to find a happy balance between adhering to strict safety standards and making daring play creations that are capable of challenging our discerning and easily bored children to ‘make the first leap, the first jump and the first climb’.

Of course, the greatest threat to public PlaYgrounds is other forms of play, notably computer and video games where kids can escape to a virtual playground. Nowadays (gosh, I sound like an old fart when I use this word), kids are happy to exercise their nifty fingers and hand-eye coordination on the video screen. They find contentment in building virtual forts and cities with bricks that do not take up physical storage space, use bitcoins and tokens to learn the concept of buy and sell, and of course, figure their way out of complex mazes all from the comforts of their air-conditioned bedroom, or from their baby car seat.

(We signed up for the art workshop and created our own playground with paper, sticks, straws and napkins)

Check out Lemady’s weekly storycraft sessions: http://www.storycraft.ch/ and find out more about the PlaYground project and dates for their family art workshops: http://kunsthallezurich.ch/de

 

 

 

 

Zurich just became a little more hip and cool…

… like it was a century ago.

Switzerland has never been known to be a magnet for the creative and literary arts in Europe. Unlike Paris, known for being the pulsating center for the artistic avant-garde, the Scandinavia for their minimalistic Nordic coolness, or Barcelona for its Picasso-Miro-Gaudi eclecticism, Zurich is more known for its staid work ethic and clockwork efficiency.

Tada!

FullSizeRender (31)It came as a surprise to me that 100 years ago, the present little bar/student cafe in the heart of Zurich old town – Cabaret Voltaire, was where the Dada movement, the predecessor of the more famous Surrealism (Salvador Dali) was born.

After World War 1 in the 1920s, neutral Zurich became the natural meeting point for many European artists and a sort of ‘anti’ art emerged – where anything in your day-to-day life can be used as a form of artistic expression. The Dada mandate became a visualized critique of the war led by Germany and nationalistic sentiments.

A series of art shows, talks, city tours and even a costume ball will be conducted throughout Zurich for its centennial celebrations from February to July. A special 165 Days of Feast will culminate in a Dada Benediction with reference to the Holy Catholic Mass at the Cabaret Voltaire. I think it is very fitting that the Mass will give the Dada blessing to Lady Gaga.

Swiss visual-arts maestro

I couldn’t help but snicker at the name Pipilotti. (Isn’t it the name of a Swiss cartoon character?) Besides the ‘Dadaglobe’ exhibition, the Kunsthaus is currently showcasing a retrospective exhibition by the Swiss-born female artist, Pipilotti Rist.

Bizarrely titled ‘Your saliva is my diving suit in the ocean of pain’, it is an entire pitch-black floor space filled with her object assemblages and video sculptures.

I like her audiovisual installation ‘Yoghurt on skin, velvet on TV’ made up of 3 big seashells and handbags with built-in LCD monitors. If you look closely inside the shell, you can see a giant moving eye peering through.

Another interesting one is ‘Little Make-up table with feedback’, with an array of jewelry, make up and knick knack casually thrown on a dressing table. If you look at the mirror, you see a video clip of someone puckering her luscious red-stained lips. It is as if the subject becomes the object, the protagonist seeing how something or some situation is seen from the ‘opposite side of the mirror’ so to speak.

The most arresting installation would have to be the large chandelier above a non-descript dining table, made up of many pairs of underwear with colored lights projected on it called ‘Cape Cod Chandelier’. These 2 art exhibitions at the Zurich Kunsthaus are definitely worth visiting. I don’t want to post up too many photos so you can experience the art in person.

In the spirit of Dadaism and experiencing the visual arts, care to buy a pair of funky spectacle frames along bahnhofstrasse?

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Keeping up with 2016

Are we close to the end of February already?

For some reason, the Christmas festivities and craziness seem to extend well into 2016 and I am still trying to play catch up.

I think it has something to go with the fact that my husband’s been away a fair bit, the weather’s been dreary and we’ve got an influx of visitors from far and wide coming to stay with us almost every other weekend.

After staying in Switzerland and experiencing change in seasons for almost 8 years, I still haven’t really warmed up (pun intended) to the biting cold, flu bugs, dry flaky skin, body aches and skies turning dark at 5pm.

The ski/snowboard devil, together with his earthly minions disguised as cool, crazy friends, has abducted my husband and kids for the whole season, somewhat akin to Hades keeping Persephone in the underworld. Anyone who knows my husband knows I am not exaggerating here!

IMG_3088I’ve survived and conquered the Sports Ferien at our ski apartment in the mountains last week with 2 families and 7 young boys! My husband was travelling for the week, one of the mums was working 100% so she couldn’t join us but bizarrely it was the most relaxing week I’ve had since mid December. The boys and dads were skiing the whole day so the mayhem only came in the evening with everyone vying for showers and snacks, the womenfolk preparing dinner and winding the kids down for the night’s sleep.

The New Year really came with a blast for me personally. I am finally brave enough, or maybe it was the chaos and busyness of entering into a new year that propelled me to pursue my passion in painting. The last time I’ve painted was perhaps 6 years ago, and it was a fleeting hobby that I never really indulge in with 2 young kids taking up most of my time and draining most of my energy.

The kids are still a handful but a lot less dependent on me now. They are a source of inspiration to me and I find the peace and quiet within me through painting to survive the lack of sunshine and the mundane daily routine.

My boys love seeing me in my element when I am sitting on the cold floor with paint blotches all over my hands and I think they do feel proud that mommy is becoming an artist! Of course they still complain that my cooking sucks and I still mix up my husband and kids’ underwear every now and then…

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You can check out my complete art portfolio at amyangatelier.wordpress.com

 

A winter sonata

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageComing from a tropical island with no seasons, I’m always amazed by the bronze, amber and yellow falling autumn leaves, the mysterious swirly fog (well the smog that blows through from Indonesia doesn’t count!), blooming spring flowers and heady lavender scents. The snow capped mountains and wintry landscapes are the most special to me. I can’t help but feel so tiny standing in a vast, white soft field of… Nothing. Everything feels clean, pure and quiet in winter.

Spider-Man in the making

Last September my husband decided on a whim to bring my 7 year old son rock climbing even though he has no experience scaling any walls himself. The via Ferrata – diavolo, or ‘the devil’s climb’ in Andermatt in canton Uri is actually a pretty exciting n relatively easy rock face for beginners, as long as you have no fear of heights, have a strong resistance to chilly winds and of course appropriate climbing attire. See my husband’s attire for ‘what not to wear for climbing a rough rock face with a 90% probability of tripping over your own feet and face planting’.

The wily fox and 5 city girls

  Our friend celebrated her 30th birthday on Saturday and we were treated to a game called Foxtrail, the Swiss version of The Amazing Race, which gave us a good opportunity to discover Bern beyond its famous Zytglogge clock tower, beautiful cobbled streets in the old town and their beloved black bears.

We were divided into 4 groups doing 4 unique trails – 2 groups of 5 girls each, and 2 groups of 5 guys. My group comprised of 3 Singaporeans, 1 Indonesian and 1 Vietnamese, and of course, my little boy in the pram. Did I mention we are all from Zurich and do not speak or understand BERNESE Swiss german?😉

It was a warm and sunny autumn day and our energy level was at an all time high when we were handed our trail paper with clues and instructions. It quickly dissipated when after 45mins, we were the only team still at the starting point, trying to figure out what we were suppose to do. We have 19 stops to make in 2 hours!!! We will miss the Apero! 

 It was a slow and bumpy start but we soon got our groove and took a special RKS train out of the city center in search of a church tower that led us deep into the woods. My little boy Nathan, who does a forest playgroup every Thursday, seems to know his way around the trees better than the 5 of us. We found a quaint restaurant tucked deep in the forest overlooking a beautiful river. Chickens, ducks and kids roamed around carefreely around the restaurant/farm. After finding our way out of the forest, this was civilization to us!

  We even got to ask a boatman for a clue (feels a little like crossing the River Styx except the boatman was not wearing a dark cloak and you don’t hear the cries of banished souls around us) and he rowed or should I say, held on to a long rope above him that is tied to the other end of the stream and literally ‘pulled’ us to the other side. I think it was only 200 meters away.

   
  


E The wily fox then led us through a long tunnel to… the border of Switzerland? We were all pretty amused to see the EU sign at one of our trail points. I didn’t see a tax refund booth close by though.

   

 We didn’t complete our trail but it was still an amazing experience. When we went to the end point for our apero and birthday celebration, it was exhilarating exchanging stories of our different routes. We were all pretty impressed by how organized and fun this experience was.

We will come back again and redo the same trail and hopefully, complete it so we can finally beat the wily fox!

http://www.foxtrail.ch

   

made it to the apero but the chips r all gone!